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Why did my polling place change?


The most common reason a polling place moves is that the building is no longer available or suitable for use.

You may also vote somewhere new after redistricting, when precinct boundaries are re-drawn.

When a polling place moves, your local election office will send a notice to affected households with at least one registered voter.

Avoid going to the wrong place 

Polling place aren't permanent, and locations can change from one election to the next. 

Before you head out to vote, it's smart to double-check where you vote.

Who chooses polling places?

Cities and towns usually choose polling place locations. 

The Office of the Secretary of State does not have a role in choosing or changing specific polling places.

A school district board can choose to centralize polling places across the district into one or several locations. This is only true during standalone school district elections (meaning it doesn't coincide with any other state or local elections). 

If you are voting in a school district election, be sure to double-check your polling place.