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Polling place accessibility


Federal and state laws require that all polling places be accessible and usable by elderly voters or voters with disabilities.

Minimum requirements for accessibility include:

  • At least one set of doors must have a minimum width of 32 inches if the doors must be used to enter or leave the polling place.

  • Any curb adjacent to the main entrance to a polling place must have curb cuts or temporary ramps. Where the main entrance is not the accessible entrance, any curb adjacent to the accessible entrance must also have curb cuts or temporary ramps.

  • Where the main entrance is not the accessible entrance, a sign shall be posted at the main entrance giving directions to the accessible entrance.

  • At least one set of stairs must have a temporary handrail and ramp if stairs must be used to enter or leave the polling place.

  • No barrier in the polling place may impede the path of persons with disabilities to the voting booth.

  • At least one parking space for persons with disabilities, which may be temporarily so designated by the municipality for the day of the election, must be available near the accessible entrance.

  • The doorway, handrails, ramps, and handicapped parking must conform to the standards specified in the state building code for accessibility by persons with disabilities.

A local official can only choose polling places that meet these standards, unless no available place within a precinct is accessible or can be made accessible.

Report a problem

Cities and towns choose polling place locations and are responsible for polling place accessibility. Contact your city or township clerk if a polling place is not accessible.

City and township clerks should visit polling locations periodically to check that polling locations are accessible. The Office of the Secretary of State's Polling Place Accessibility Diagnostic Tool gives instructions on how polling place inspections should be performed.

Additional accommodations

There are many ways to get help when you vote. You can bring someone to help, ask an election judge, use a machine to help you mark your ballot or vote from your vehicle. Learn more ways to get help voting.