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‘Minnesota Students Vote 2016’ Mock Election Results

November 1, 2016

Over 77,000 high school students have voted so far in Minnesota’s first statewide mock election for president

SAINT PAUL — Today, Secretary of State Steve Simon announced the first round of results for Minnesota Students Vote 2016, the first statewide mock election for high school students. Over 77,000 students from 213 high schools so far have cast a mock ballot for U.S. President.

The results show, as of Oct. 31, Donald J. Trump and Michael R. Pence (Republican) narrowly defeating Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine (Democratic-Farmer-Labor) by about two percent—34.97% to 32.89%. The Trump/Pence ticket received 26,930 votes and the Clinton/Kaine ticket received 25,333 votes. Additional high schools have scheduled their mock election between now and Election Day (November 8), and results will be updated at that time.

Click here to visit the Students Vote 2016 results page, which includes full statewide results, individual school results, school district maps, and additional information.

“The Students Vote 2016 initiative is about getting good habits started early and this year tens of thousands of young and soon-to-be voters had the opportunity to get invaluable, hands-on experience with the electoral process,” said Secretary Simon. “I’m especially grateful to the hundreds of schools, administrators, teachers and students who helped administer the mock election, and the over 77,000 students who made their voices heard.”

High schools were required to report results by 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 26 for inclusion in the first round of results. Each high school was given the ability to decide how and where the voting took place, whether in one central location, over the lunch hour, in individual classrooms, or something entirely different.

What teachers, administrators and students are saying about Students Vote 2016:

  • “This was an excellent opportunity for the students to see democracy in action.” [Faribault Daily News, 10/27/16]

  • "It empowers the kids to take part in politics… I'm always trying to make things relevant. Isn't it cool that they get to vote at 15, 16? Taking part in the political action is very cool." [Bemidji Pioneer, 10/26/16]

  • "Their vote matters, they need to see how accessible the voting process is, that they can participate, decisions are made by those who show up.” [KSTP, 10/26/16]

  • "Ms. Gardner, that's the first time someone from our family voted," said Guydan Hajsakor, 17, a Syrian refugee who has been in the U.S. about 11 months. "You know, my dad never went for the Syrian presidential race because he said it's a big lie." He said he plans to vote in the next presidential election when he'll be a citizen. "It's a big deal, your voice is heard," Hajsakor said. "When I'm a citizen, my voice will matter." [Rochester Post-Bulletin, 10/25/16]

  • “It’s nice to see what a ballot looks like so we’re not surprised when we actually can vote.” [Hibbing Daily Tribune, 10/21/16]

  • “It’s nice to kind of get a feel for what a real election is like.” [Faribault Daily News, 10/27/16]

  • “I think it's awesome because they're learning the actual process instead of just us talking about it, they actually get to see how it works.” [Rochester Post-Bulletin, 10/26/16]

  • “It gives the students some ownership… It gives them a voice and lets the students watch the elections and think about the difference between them as students and the real voters." [Detroit Lakes Tribune, 10/26/16]

  • "When they enter a real polling place for the first time, everything that they're seeing or experiencing is not completely foreign to them." [KEYC, 10/26/16]

  • "They have at the very least an opportunity to become aware, to open them up to new ideas, to give them a taste of citizen participation.” [Fargo Forum, 10/26/16]

  • "This is kind of a good practice run to see what the ballot looks like and stand in the cubicle to see who you want to vote for.” [KSTP, 10/28/16]

  • "My hope for this is to be long term, letting the students be active in the elections for the rest of their lives.” [Detroit Lakes Tribune, 10/26/16]

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